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What is your breast cancer risk?

March 12, 2018

Estrogen alone is not the issue when it comes to increasing the risk of breast cancer. The real issue is how is your estrogen being metabolized. You want to have your clinician order a test that evaluates the estrogen metabolites.

 

**I usually recommend the Dutch Test (https://dutchtest.com)

 

Here is an image demonstrating 2 and 16 hydroxyesterone and the ration between both which is predictive of breast cancer risk.

 

 

The liver converts estrogens into estrogen metabolites. Three of estrogen's metabolites, the breakdown products of this hormone, are 2-hydroxyestrone, 4-hydroxyestrone, and 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone.

 

 

Since the 1980s, 2-hydroxyestrone has been considered a "good" or chemoprotective form of estrogen, while 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone has been associated with the development of cancer. It can fuel the growth and division of hormone-dependent and other cancer cells more than the 2-hydroxyestrones can. The 2-hydroxyestrones, in contrast, have almost no estrogenic effect. Prevailing evidence has shown that the ratio of 2-hydroxyestrone to 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone is relevant as a risk factor for estrogen-sensitive cancers, including breast and cervical cancers. Simply put, when it comes to estrogen metabolites, you want more 2s than 16s. And guess what can help the body do that? Cruciferous vegetables.

 

HOW TO GET DETOXIFY UNWANTED ESTROGENS.

 

Two components in cruciferous vegetables are indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and diindolylmethane (DIM). Studies have found that these compounds can inhibit the formation of the "bad" 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone estrogen metabolite. One study found that DIM had the ability to decrease its production by 50 percent while increasing production of the "good" 2-hydroxyestrone metabolite by 75 percent.

 

I3C is found in a number of cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, kale, kohlrabi, mustard greens, radish, rutabaga, and turnip. The highest concentrations are found in garden cress (different from watercress) and mustard greens.

 

If you are concerned about your breast cancer risk then get in touch and we can run a hormone panel and review your levels of 'unhealthy' estrogens compared to your 'healthy' estrogen levels.

 

Paul Foley
Nutritional Therapist
Dip Nut CNM, mBANT, mCNH

 Phone; 0759 793 6899
Email; paul@pfoleyclinic.com
Web; www.pfoleyclinic.com

 

 

This was adapted and edited with compliments from Functional Medicine University www.FunctionalMedicineUniversity.com. Paul is a graduate of the University.

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